The Advantages of Growing Onions from Seeds for the Experienced Gardener

Onions can be grown three ways:  through transplants, sets or seeds.  Sowing seeds is the favorite of most experienced gardeners because it has certain advantages you won’t find in transplants and onion sets.

It takes a little more skill than knowing how to water when growing onions with seeds.  In fact, cultivating onions is trickier than garlic.

To begin with, there are about 400 different varieties of onion, with each one having different length of storage and planting and harvest season.  For instance, Pukekohe Long Keeper has a reputation of keeping long and is a common variety planted in New Zealand.

Another variety, Senshyu Semi-globe Yellow is a Japanese onion cultivar that must be planted only in autumn and should not be sown after the winter equinox.  They are harvested middle of the summer season.

It is important to know these things if you want to successfully grow onions from seeds.

Most experienced gardeners understand how good soil preparation is essential in making main crop onion seeds grow to its full potential.

Dig the soil in the fall, allowing the frost to break down soil clods so it would have a finer texture when you are ready to plant.  Add well-compost manure for nutrients and the acidity of the soil must be from six to 7 pH.  A neutral soil would also do as well.  Use a testing kit for a more accurate figure on the soil’s acidity.

Location and timing are important, too.  Choose a dry day to sow your seeds in its permanent bed so they can build soil fertility and the sunniest spot you can find in your garden with good drainage.

Onion growers also sow their main crop onion seeds under glass in January.  This would ensure them of an early but great, big bulbs.

Once they have grown, hoeing onion plants would give them a good start so sow the seeds in straight rows.  Remove flower stems so the plant can concentrate on making the bulbs bigger instead of setting seeds.

Follow these tips and you would surely have a successful yield come harvest time!

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